Wednesday, June 1, 2016

DEVICES USED AT THE PHONETIC AND PHONOLOGIC LEVEL


Phonetic devices are those which make use of the combinations and repetition of sounds, and of different patterns of rhythm. The most important devices are:
Alliteration: The multiple, close repetition of the same sound, aiming to imitate a given sound or to give a certain sensation. “That silly scent Willy sent Millicent.” The repetition of the sound “s” makes the reader think of the sound made by perfume being pulverized from a bottle.
Paronomasia: A play on words or a pun in which homophone words are used, although their meaning is different. “They delivered summer dresses to some addresses.“
Rhyme: Endings that sound similarly for different phrases, sentences or lines. “Pretty women wonder where my secret lies. / I'm not cute or built to suit a fashion model's size.” In this case, both lines end with the same sounds, /īz/, so the word “lies” rhymes with “size”.

Monday, May 16, 2016

Class recommendations


Take guests to the classroom to hear their retelling and recommendations of books is a way of showing that reading is an activity many people do and enjoy.
            They can invite another teacher, a parent or guardian, a narrator or writer so that they can also share their stories and favorite books with the students.

1.      Many times, hearing a reading out loud - a story, a poem, a biography, a chapter from a novel, etc. - gives students the opportunity to access texts that are more complex than their own reading levels.  This enriches their knowledge and is a shared way of enjoying literature.
Periodically, read to the students out loud and motivate them to, at the end of the hour, comment on how they feel about what they heard.
To prepare this activity, it is convenient to:
1.      Select readings adequate for the reading level of the students
2.      Prepare the reading beforehand
3.      Define words the students may not recognize
4.      Read expressively, making sure the intonation goes accordingly with the reading
2. Shared reading consists in the students reading a common text out loud with the teacher.  This exercise is an opportunity to show fluidity and expressive reading, especially in readers that are just beginning.

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Reading journals


By writing, students give depth to their reading experiences and start to relate what they read to what they live and experience for themselves.  You can invite your students to keep a reading journal.  This journal would be used all year long.  In it, you could ask students to write about what most interested them about each chapter in the book they are reading, focusing on connecting that to an experience they may have had or what they would do in a similar situation. Then, you can ask them to share what they write during reading hour.
2.  For students, a way of recognizing the importance of reading is by becoming authors themselves and experiencing their own creativity.
You can use reading hour to do activities that go with this theme like:
            -rewriting a story in a class setting
            -rewriting the end of a story and changing the main character's destiny
            -writing poetry in a specific structure
            -writing a letter to the author of a book they liked proposing ideas for a sequel
3. A great incentive for getting involved in literature is having someone to share it with.
You can prepare a reading party with a special guest - the school principal, a teacher, family member, or an important person for the community - to make it a special event.  The purpose of this activity is to have each student prepare a piece to read to an audience that is interested in this special event.
4.  Going further than the text is a good opportunity for the enrichment of the reader's experience.  Moreover, this type of activities lets students discuss what they read in groups.
Here are some alternate activities you can do with your students during reading hour:
-creating a play out of a story by writing a script, creating a wardrobe, and a set
-put the characters in the story on trial
-make sculptures that represent the character's personalities
-make advertisements to publicize the book
-illustrate a story or turn it into a comic strip
-buy the movie that goes with the book

Monday, April 11, 2016

A great incentive for getting involved in literature

A great incentive for getting involved in literature is having someone to share it with.

You can prepare a reading party with a special guest - the school principal, a teacher, family member, or an important person for the community - to make it a special event.  The purpose of this activity is to have each student prepare a piece to read to an audience that is interested in this special event.
4.  Going further than the text is a good opportunity for the enrichment of the reader's experience.  Moreover, this type of activities lets students discuss what they read in groups.
Here are some alternate activities you can do with your students during reading hour:
-creating a play out of a story by writing a script, creating a wardrobe, and a set
-put the characters in the story on trial
-make sculptures that represent the character's personalities
-make advertisements to publicize the book
-illustrate a story or turn it into a comic strip
-buy the movie that goes with the book

n what they read and how it relates to the original book.
4.         Illustrations are a very good way of getting students more interested in reading, especially for those who have difficulties with it.
            You can select picture books to read with the students during reading hour and show them how the illustrations and words tell the story.  To use picture books you can:
-tell the story as the pictures illustrate it and then ask students to draw their own illustrations to incorporate into the book
-arrange the students into groups and asking each to tell the story being told through the illustrations their book has as they show them to the rest of the class

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

Illustrations in literature


Illustrations are a very good way of getting students more interested in reading, especially for those who have difficulties with it.
            You can select picture books to read with the students during reading hour and show them how the illustrations and words tell the story.  To use picture books you can:
-tell the story as the pictures illustrate it and then ask students to draw their own illustrations to incorporate into the book
-arrange the students into groups and asking each to tell the story being told through the illustrations their book has as they show them to the rest of the class
1.  By writing, students give depth to their reading experiences and start to relate what they read to what they live and experience for themselves.  You can invite your students to keep a reading journal.  This journal would be used all year long.  In it, you could ask students to write about what most interested them about each chapter in the book they are reading, focusing on connecting that to an experience they may have had or what they would do in a similar situation. Then, you can ask them to share what they write during reading hour.
2.  For students, a way of recognizing the importance of reading is by becoming authors themselves and experiencing their own creativity.
You can use reading hour to do activities that go with this theme like:
            -rewriting a story in a class setting
            -rewriting the end of a story and changing the main character's destiny
            -writing poetry in a specific structure
            -writing a letter to the author of a book they liked proposing ideas for a sequel

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Familiarize the reader


Familiarize the readers with the context in which the stories take place is key for them to understand better and, in turn, enjoy what they are reading.
            For this, they can pick a part of the book that everyone is reading and present a selection of books related to this that can be found in the school library.  For example, if the class is reading "Los Cuentos de la Selva" by Horacio Quiroga, they can select books like an atlas to situate Uruguay, books about the amazon jungle and its wild animals, Horacio Quiroga's biography, other books by the same author, or other related books. 
The following activities can be done with their selected works:
-Presenting information about the author and the book that is about to be read.  They can use the selected books to show that there is more information outside the book and where to find it.
-Organize a reading hour based on Quiroga's writings and, at the end, have everyone comment o3.  Familiarize the readers with the context in which the stories take place  is key for them to understand better and, in turn, enjoy what they are reading.
            For this, they can pick a part of the book that everyone is reading and present a selection of books related to this that can be found in the school library.  For example, if the class is reading "Los Cuentos de la Selva" by Horacio Quiroga, they can select books like an atlas to situate Uruguay, books about the amazon jungle and its wild animals, Horacio Quiroga's biography, other books by the same author, or other related books. 
The following activities can be done with their selected works:
-Presenting information about the author and the book that is about to be read.  They can use the selected books to show that there is more information outside the book and where to find it.
-Organize a reading hour based on Quiroga's writings and, at the end, have everyone comment on what they read and how it relates to the original book.